In the sign of design: Four ingredients for a stylish meeting in Copenhagen

The Danish capital of Copenhagen is a city that is justly famous for its artsy flair and creative atmosphere and that has been driving a flourishing, now world-renowned design movement. We’ll show you how you can hold a productive scientific meeting that also integrates the best and most cutting-edge features of its host destination for the pleasure of its attendees – from the venue to the post-congress tours. These are the ingredients for a stylish meeting in cool Copenhagen:


1.    Gather in Style: Tivoli Congress Center

 

Tivoli Congress Center is part of a larger complex located in the city centre of Copenhagen and also includes Tivoli Hotel, shopping areas and a swimming pool. The centre, which features 55 meeting rooms and can accommodate up to 5.500 people, is a remarkable example of the work of Danish star architect Kim Utzon. The importance light plays in his designs can perhaps best be admired in the large Congress Hall, which can accommodate up to 2.400 people and on sunny days is literally flooded with sunlight, thanks to the pyramid-shaped windows along the ceiling.

© tivolicongresscenter.comPhoto © tivolicongresscenter.com

2.    Party in style: Toldboden restaurant


This stylish restaurant’s motto is “Location, sustainability and enthusiasm”. The first one is a no-brainer: Toldboden is located directly by the pier and offers stunning views of the Opera House. In sunny weather, guests can enjoy some scenery and people-watching in deck chairs outside, accompanied by drinks and barbecue. Indoor rooms are airy, with many windows and simplistic wooden furniture.  Sustainability is all about sourcing ingredients in a manner that preserves the environment and indeed Toldboden’s is the first menu to have been approved as climate-friendly by the Danish Minister of Environment and Food. It places a heavy emphasis on fresh, seasonal and local produce and sea food served in creative ways. Enthusiasm is about the way the owners follow their principles and their unique service culture. The restaurant offers space for up to 500 people, so it is suitable for social and corporate events of various kinds. Make sure you book the whole venue exclusively if you have a very large group. The easiest way to transfer is via scenic boat ride. 

 © ESTS 2014

Photo © ESTS 2014


3.    Dine in style: National Gallery of Denmark

Art meets architecture meets cuisine if you should decide to hold your evening reception or Gala Dinner at the Statens Museum for Kunst, or, National Gallery of Denmark. Here, old meets new, which is already evident in the design of the building. The original museum building stems from the late 19th century and, 100 years later, has received a modern annex to house the modern collection. The two tracts are joined by the “Street of Sculptures” walkway, which offers space for up to 500 people in a seated dinner scenario. The gallery houses the largest art collection in the country, with a focus on Danish art through all ages, but also an impressive portion of works by international masters. One of the exhibitions can be opened specially for your event, so your delegates can have a private moment or two with the masterpieces. The gallery works with two exclusive caterers, who know the venue inside out. 

© EAED 2016

Photo © EAED 2016


4.    Unwind in style: Copenhagen museums and galleries


Always a good idea if you have design-thirsty delegates on your hands: Let them loose on the city to do some discovering of their own. Hip Vesterbro or trendy Nørrebro are good starting points, but in fact the whole city is dotted with design shops. If your delegates prefer looking to buying, point them towards Design Museum Denmark. Famous architect Henning Larsen designed the building with the sole purpose of showcasing the best in graphic and product design. With a little bit more time on your hands, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is the place to go. A short train ride away, the museum is located by the seaside and is a perfect example of how art and architecture can coexist in perfect symbiosis with their environment.

 

©  Morten Bjarnhof / copenhagenmediacenter.com

Photo © Morten Bjarnhof / copenhagenmediacenter.com